Daily Archives: 5 April 2018

Updated Headlines for Sad Saga in New Britain, Connecticut



 OPINION  |  NEW BRITAIN’S PROPOSED MONUMENT FOR LEADER OF A 1941 HITLERIST MILITIA |  GLORIFYING COLLABORATORS  |  USA  |  LITHUANIA  |  CHRISTIAN-JEWISH RELATIONS  | ANTISEMITISM & BIAS  |  HUMAN RIGHTS

Will New Britain, Connecticut really allow a public monument to an alleged Nazi collaborator?  City Council member Professor Aram Ayalon launches petition calling for moratorium pending researchLatest. 

Will Mayor Erin E. Stewart break her silence with some rapid words of simple moral clarity? This is even worse than Charlottesville: It’s about putting up a new monument for an alleged Nazi collaborator on public land in Connecticut. Where’s leadership?

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Posted in Antisemitism & Bias, Celebrations of Fascism, Collaborators Glorified, Human Rights, Lithuania, Litvak Affairs, New Britain, Connecticut: Plans to Glorify Alleged Nazi Collaborator?, News & Views, Opinion, Politics of Memory | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Updated Headlines for Sad Saga in New Britain, Connecticut

Could Lithuania’s Single Freedom of Speech Lapse be on Questions of History?


(UPDATED)

FREEDOM OF SPEECH  |  HUMAN RIGHTS  |  POLITICS OF MEMORY  |  LITHUANIA  |  LITVAK AFFAIRS

VILNIUS—The international uproar over Poland’s new law criminalizing certain opinions about World War II and the Holocaust has led to coverage in mainstream mass media internationally. What seems to have been largely lost is that other East European countries have for many years been passing laws criminalizing opinions on these matters, laws that are arguably much worse, because they go beyond state anger at stereotyping or historic accusation to criminalizing opposition to a false narrative of history, specifically the Double Genocide model espoused by the ultranationalist establishment in much of Eastern Europe, particularly the Baltics and Ukraine. Such laws have been passed in Hungary (2010, maxing out at three years potential imprisonment), Lithuania (2010, two years), Latvia (2014, five years max) and Ukraine (2015, ten years). Then there was Estonia’s particularly curious “Valentine Day’s Law” of 2012. It could well be, that the parliamentarians who came up with the idea in Lithuania long before passage were the most honest about the motives. They made it clear that “in the Lithuanian legal system, acts regarding the the crimes of Soviet genocide, i.e., their denial or justification, are not criminalized, and, experts say, this is an obstacle in attempting to equate the crimes of Soviet genocide with the Nazi genocide.”

“But don’t the citizens of the Baltics deserve the same level of freedom of speech as everyone else in the European Union?”

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Posted in Free Speech & Democracy, Lithuania, Litvak Affairs, News & Views, Politics of Memory | Comments Off on Could Lithuania’s Single Freedom of Speech Lapse be on Questions of History?